Citizens Archaeology: How To Become A Citizen Scientist

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If you were the kind of kid who loved science projects then chances are you're now an adult who might be wondering what to do with all this enthusiasm. Many people believe that participating in citizens archaeology is a great way to get involved in research as it can take many forms. Check out this article for ideas on how to become a citizen scientist!

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If you were the kind of kid who loved science projects then chances are you’re now an adult who might be wondering what to do with all this enthusiasm. Many people believe that participating in citizens archaeology is a great way to get involved in research as it can take many forms. Check out this article for ideas on how to become a citizen scientist!

Introduction to Archaeology

Welcome to the blog section of ‘Citizens Archaeology: How To Become A Citizen Scientist’. Here we’ll be discussing all things archaeology, from what it is and how to get involved, to some of the most famous discoveries made by citizen archaeologists.

So, what is archaeology? In short, it is the study of humanity’s past through material remains. This can include anything from buildings and tools, to bones and pottery. By piecing together these clues, archaeologists can learn about how our ancestors lived, what they believed in, and what kind of mark they left on the world.

One of the great things about archaeology is that anyone can get involved. You don’t need years of training or expensive equipment; all you need is a little bit of curiosity and a willingness to get your hands dirty. There are lots of ways to get involved in citizen archaeology, whether it’s helping with an excavation, sifting through dirt for artifacts, or simply doing your own research at home.

The most famous discovery made by a citizen archaeologist is probably the Rosetta Stone. This famous artifact helped scholars decipher the hieroglyphs on ancient Egyptian monuments, giving us a better understanding of this time long puzzle.

What are the benefits of citizen archaeology?

Citizen archaeology is a great way for people to get involved in the study of history and archaeology. There are many benefits to becoming a citizen scientist, including gaining a better understanding of the past, getting to know your local community, and making new friends.

Citizen archaeology can also be a great way to learn about new cultures and gain a new perspective on the world. As a citizen archaeologist, you will have the opportunity to work with experts from all over the world and learn about their cultures and customs. You will also have the chance to visit archaeological sites that are not open to the public.

How does one become a citizen scientist?

There are many ways to become a citizen scientist! One can volunteer with or donate to an organization, participate in data collection or analysis, or use technology to engage in scientific research. There are also many online and offline communities of citizen scientists, where people share their passion for science and collaborate on projects.

Citizen science is a term used to describe the act of ordinary citizens collecting and providing data for scientific research projects. There are many ways to get involved in citizen science, from taking part in online surveys to downloading apps that track your movements or the wildlife you encounter.

No matter what your interests are, there is likely a citizen science project that you can get involved in. And with the rise of mobile technology and social media, it has never been easier to get started.

So how does one become a citizen scientist? Below are a few tips:

Find a project that interests you: There are hundreds of citizen science projects underway at any given time, so finding one that piques your interest should not be too difficult. A quick Google search will reveal many of the current projects looking for volunteers.

Sign up and follow the instructions: Once you have found a project you would like to take part in, sign up and follow the instructions provided. This usually involves completing an online form and providing some basic information about yourself.

Start collecting data: This is the fun part! Depending on the project, you may be asked to track your movements, document the wildlife you encounter, or even collect samples from your local

Maritime archaeology and Citizen science

Maritime archaeology is the study of human interaction with the sea, ships, and coastal environments. It is a field that relies heavily on citizen science to help with data collection and analysis.

There are many ways for interested members of the public to get involved in maritime archaeology. One way is to join a local chapter of The Society for Historical Archaeology or The Explorers Club. These organizations often have volunteer opportunities available.

Another way to get involved is to participate in one of the many citizen science projects that focus on maritime archaeology. One such project is called ‘Passports in Time’ and is run by the Bureau of Land Management. This project asks volunteers to help document shipwrecks and other maritime heritage sites. Another one is “The Big Anchor Project” wich askes the public to register anchors found on land and in the ocean.

If you’re interested in learning more about maritime archaeology, there are many online resources available, including the Maritime Archaeology Forum and the International Council on Monuments and Sites.

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